25 June 2005

Thought-fragments during a very busy day

  1. Crying over Spilt CoffeeI spilled a full cup of coffee (with cream, no sugar) directly into my keyboard this morning. Quick thinking seems to have saved my lap top. I instantly turned it off, flipped it upside down, and used a towel to dry off everything I could reach. Then I used Q-Tips to soak up as much from under and between the keys as possible. It's not the kind of keyboard where the key caps pop off easily. (Last time I tried popping keys off, I had to have my whole keyboard replaced.) So I just let it dry naturally for two hours. Since the coffee got all over my gym shorts, too, I waited till they were fully dry before turning the lap top back on. It seems to be working flawlessly so far. It's a Dell, BTW. It's been an amazingly sturdy machine. I've had it more than 2 years and dragged it all around the world with me. I can't tell you how many times it has been dropped and spilled on. Darlene saw how much coffee I spilt, and she was genuinely amazed when the computer started up perfectly two hours later. As it heats up, it's giving off a nice aroma of coffee & cream. But I think it's about time for me to start shopping for a new lap top.
  2. Contending for the FaithHere's a book you're not likely to encounter in most Christian bookshops, but it's well worth a careful read. Contending for the Faith is a biography of E. J. Poole-Connor, by David G. Fountain, originally published in 1966 with a foreword by D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. Poole-Connor was an important figure in British Evangelicalism whose ministry spanned the first half of the twentieth century. He was arguably the most important evangelical separatist in the UK between the time of Spurgeon (who influenced him greatly) and Lloyd-Jones (whom he in turn influenced). This revised edition includes an appendix about Lloyd-Jones's separatism and a postscript by Dr. Peter Masters, pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London. Unfortunately, biblical separatism is not a particularly popular idea these days among evangelicals anywhere—but especially in the UK. So I'm grateful to see this book in back in print in a new edition. It's an insightful perspective on the history of the early twentieth-century evangelical movement in the UK. If you're a subscriber to The Sword & Trowel, you should have received a copy by mail already. If not, you can purchase a copy at the Tabernacle Bookshop—and be sure to subscribe to S&T; you can do it on line.
  3. The Metropolitan Tabernacle, LondonSpeaking of the Met Tab, I'll be there next Sunday (a week from tomorrow), and for most of the following week. That week is the annual School of Theology, one of my two favorite annual conferences in the whole world. (The other is the Shepherds' Conference at my own home church.) You might think "School of Theology" sounds like a forum for dry, technical academic lectures. Not so. The conference is attended by hundreds of lay people and students, and although the biblical and theological issues that are usually addressed are not the kinds of things you would naturally think of as "user-friendly," I've never heard anyone complain that either the speakers or the issues were over anyone's head. I've always found it richly edifying, and the fellowship with likeminded people there is likewise manna for my soul.
  4. Another of those infamous BlogSpotting posts is on its way tomorrow. Could be the last one ever. Watch for details to come.
  5. The rest of this coming week promises to be a hard one for me. I have two memorial services to attend—one Monday, another Tuesday. They are for two different Christian leaders who were each used by God in profound ways to further the work of the gospel—and whose impact you have most likely felt in one way or another, whether you knew these men or not. They each went to heaven last week within days of each other. Their services are in separate states, so I'll definitely be on the road more than usual this week. I'm planning a couple of special blogposts to honor each of these two dear brethren. Watch this space.



11 comments:

fickett said...

Glad to read that your computer is fine. By the way, no matter what you read on the internet, your computer should not be used as a cup holder, nor is your computer top-rack dishwasher safe. I'll see if we can get your next computer Scotch Guarded. I'll you Wednesday.

Carla said...

Phil, you said "Since the coffee got all over my gym shorts, too, I waited till they were fully dry before turning the lap top back on."

Which leaves me wondering to myself...

Why in the world didn't you just change your shorts? It's not as if you didn't have TWO hours to kill, while your laptop dried out.

Which leads me to my next thought of "why am I asking him this question?"

I'm glad your keyboard was fine, and I'm sure DELL is thrilled for the plug as well.

:o)

gegraphtai said...

As one who has serviced said dell machine I am glad it started up the first time. I am certain the next troubleshooting step would have been the notorious 3 foot drop. Nonetheless I would suggest rounding up your disks and clearing at least a day on your schedule here soon ;)

- Gegraphtai

fickett said...

Phil is a huge proponent of percussive maintenance. Perhaps one day he will write all the repair methods he has used on his computers. It would likely become a best seller.

gegraphtai said...

. . .and void any warranty. :)

BlackCalvinist said...

Praise God for your quick thinking. My keyboard (to my desktop) unfortunately, became a victim of some of my soup about a year ago, and I had to invest $50 in a new keyboard (not just ANY keyboard, though I could've used a $19.99 generic USB keyboard and it would've worked fine, I chose to buy an Apple keyboard to match the computer its attached to...).

Can you be nice and mention me on your last Blogspotting adventure ? *big cheesy grin*

I've resisted asking (until I had another good entry up like the one I did on Post Secret or my recent dance partner and I do the PoMo Shuffle, but since this is the last BlogSpotting you'll be doing, I figured I'd go for broke :D

Phil Johnson said...

Kerry: Check my blogroll.

Libbie said...

Safe journey to the UK, Phil. I'm absolutely gutted that my husband won't be joining you down at the Met Tab, but he WILL do this whole responsible-husband-with-heavily-pregnant-wife-thing. tsk. Sooooo going to get the tapes, though...

Daniel Nolan said...

The laptop might be working now, but it's going to get sticky soon! Then again, my laptop is filled with chocolate and various other nibbles..

Looking forward to seeing you next week. As you say, the SoT is a wonderful event which many from the UK (and even abroad) visit annually. I was wondering when you'd mentioned it!

*idly wonders what you'll be preaching about on Sunday* :)

Daniel Nolan said...

oh, and should I warn our bookshop manager that lots of people will be getting that book? :)

Der Fuersprecher said...

Phil,

I did exactly the same thing with my dell laptop less than 2 months ago (except that I let the machine run for a few minutes more while I admired the weird and strange mosaic that my screen was creating for me)! I finally figured out that it might be wise to turn the laptop off, flip it over, and let the coffee spill out the cracks in the casing. I turned it back on 2 hours later and it was as good as gold - Dell makes robust machines indeed!

:-)